Preventing Domestic Violence

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Signs of Potential Danger Jealousy: of your friends, family, co-workers—any other relationship you may have.

Violent behavior: fights at parties, on the street, or in bars. Controlling behavior: monopolizing your time; not allowing you to make decisions about your clothes, how to wear your hair, spending money, or looking for a job.

Verbal abuse: calling you hurtful and harmful names; putting you down either in private or in public.

Mood swings: a personality that is “up and down.” You don’t know what suddenly will make them mad. They may be happy one minute and angry the next minute.

Isolation: from friends, family, neighbors. You fear that if you say “hello” to a friend, they will get jealous and angry.

Blaming: those who use abuse blame you and/or others for their problems, for example, losing a job.

Unrealistic expectations: an abusive person can be overcritical. They may expect you to be the perfect partner, lover, or friend.

Hypersensitivity: those using abuse often are easily insulted or hurt. Family history: individuals using violence may have seen domestic violence in their own families. They may have been raised believing that domestic violence is a normal behavior.

Sexist attitude toward the opposite gender: people who use violence often believe in strict gender roles. They can

Violent behavior: fights at parties, on the street, or in bars. Controlling behavior: monopolizing your time; not allowing you to make decisions about your clothes, how to wear your hair, spending money, or looking for a job.

Verbal abuse: calling you hurtful and harmful names; putting you down either in private or in public.

Mood swings: a personality that is “up and down.” You don’t know what suddenly will make them mad. They may be happy one minute and angry the next minute.

Isolation: from friends, family, neighbors. You fear that if you say “hello” to a friend, they will get jealous and angry.

Blaming: those who use abuse blame you and/or others for their problems, for example, losing a job.

Unrealistic expectations: an abusive person can be overcritical. They may expect you to be the perfect partner, lover, or friend.

Hypersensitivity: those using abuse often are easily insulted or hurt. Family history: individuals using violence may have seen domestic violence in their own families. They may have been raised believing that domestic violence is a normal behavior.

Sexist attitude toward the opposite gender: people who use violence often believe in strict gender roles. They can insisit that it is a woman’s job to care for the home and her partner.

Threats of violence: any threat or physical force that is used to control you—including the threat of suicide.